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Letters

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Thisweek’s lettersPromotingthe UK as it is in realityFarfrom believing “our workforce is diverse enough,” as you quote me in”BBC HR team defends record on minorities”, (News, 16 January), I amat one with BBC director-general Greg Dyke on the need to improve recruitment,retention and promotion of ethnic minorities. Iwas specifically appointed as head of diversity to achieve this along withpushing forward real opportunities for women, people with disabilities andthose of all ages. We have a wealth of diverse talent knocking at our door andunder-utilised in our workforce. It’s my job to see that talent is tapped, sothat the BBC’s programmes serve all its audiences and the organisation canrepresent Britain today as it really is.LindaMitchellHead of diversity, BBC Manycompanies work for schemeItwas great to see such enthusiastic coverage of the DRC’s Actions Speak LouderThan Words campaign in “Lloyds TSB puts disabled graduates on faststream”, (News, 28 November). However, the summary of Lloyds TSB’s commitmentwas slightly misleading.LloydsTSB has been a partner of the Fast-Track disabled graduate recruitment schemerun by Scope, the disability charity since, 1999. The Fast-Track scheme is notexclusive to this one employer. Although their commitment to Louder Than Wordsgrew out of their relationship with Scope, we are also in partnership with manyother high-profile companies such as HSBC, Barclays, B&Q and ICL. ChristinaMcGillPress & PR manager, ScopeLetterof the WeekAnill-considered set of rulesInresponse to the article in Personnel Today, “Data rules could curb staffabsence records”, (News, 16 January), on the subject of the proposed newcode from the Data Protection Commissioner on recording of employee sicknessabsence, I would have to say that I have never read such an ill-considered setof rules.Ourcompany operates a fairly generous sick pay scheme, paying full salary for anagreed period. If we are to be denied the opportunity to record an individual’sabsences, will I be entitled to then withhold any sick pay because I am unableto keep an accurate record of the employee’s absence? No doubt such anindividual would then quote the Equal Rights Act, Human Rights Act etc to saywe were being unfair and demand further compensation on top of  the sick pay. In addition, absence recordsare a vital part of any defence at an employment tribunal on poorattendance/health issues. Thechanges in employment law passed by this government are slowly drivingemployers to think twice as to whether it is worth employing anyone at all.TedRunciman FCIPDGroup HR manager, Currie & Brown Holdings–I strongly feel that employers should not have to get an employee’s permissionto hold sickness records.HeatherUrquhartHR officer, Schering-Plough –There is a failure to consult adequately over this. I believe this is anunnecessary increase in the administrative workload already required of HR andthere is a danger of data protection evolving into a shirker’s charter.CatherineTeagueDirector of support services, St Luke’s Hospice–Having read the article in Personnel Today on staff absence records, I say no,employees should not have to get consent from staff to record absence. This isgeneral information needed for pay calculations and to ensure fair treatment.KathyInchVia e-mail–The inability to record sickness would be disastrous, as this information isvital. It seems that no thought has been given to this matter and it should notgo ahead until the commission has undertaken a survey of employers and listenedto what they have to say.  MarjorieBradburyVia e-mail Comments are closed. LettersOn 30 Jan 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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HR directors back audits to spotlight inequalities

first_imgHR directors back audits to spotlight inequalitiesOn 6 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Two HR directors who sat on theEqual Pay Task Force have told Personnel Today that regular mandatory equal payaudits are essential if the 18 per cent gender pay gap is to be significantlyreduced. Juris Grinbergs, HR director of Littlewoods,explained that many employers were complacent about conducting pay reviews. Hepointed to an NOP survey in January 2001 that showed that only a third ofemployers conduct pay reviews. Regular pay reviews are essentialfor picking up pay inequalities, he said.  But the CIPD and CBI have calledfor a voluntary approach to pay reviews and criticised the task force’srecommendations. They believe it will result in more red tape for employers.  Bob Mason, senior vice president ofHR at BT Wireless who chaired the task force, told Personnel Today, “I rejectthe CBI’s sweeping dismissal of the recommendations. Given more careful readingof the report, I think that the CBI would find much in our recommendations,which they would support and encourage.”He explained that mandatory payreviews wouldn’t be a burden because large and medium sized employers havepayroll systems in place that can generate the data. Furthermore, companieswill only have to conduct a full pay review if discrepancies are highlighted byan initial health check of the company’s pay structures.Mason said, “I don’t accept theview that this is difficult.”Grinbergs is calling for the EqualPay Act to be amended as soon as possible, and was disappointed by the CIPD’slack of support. He said, “They focused on one lineonly. We called for other recommendations in the report such as the EOC helpingto raise employers’ awareness of equal pay issues and increasing theeffectiveness of employment tribunal procedures.”The Government remains scepticalabout implementing mandatory pay reviews, with employment minister Tessa Jowellrefusing to commit to the recommendations at the task force announcement. But Grinbergs is pushing for changeby next year. He said, “The legislative timetables are up in the air due to theGeneral Election so it’s unlikely that the law will be changed until March orApril 2002.”How the task force plans to tacklethe pay gap– Raising levels of awareness amongemployers, which involves promotion by the EOC and representative bodies suchas the CBI and CIPD– Improving equal pay legislation,introducing a requirement for employers to conduct pay reviews and streamliningtribunal processes– Improving pay review guidance foremployers and unions– Reporting equal pay reviews inemployers’ annual reports– Creating a statutory duty onpublic employers to promote equal pay– Encouraging the Government toassess how policies such as the National Minimum Wage, the National ChildcareStrategy and National Skills Agenda could narrow the pay gapHow audits will workThe Equal Pay Task Force recommendsa two-stage approach to mandatory equal pay reviews.Stage one is an assessment of thepay both sexes in an organisation receive to establish if there are payinequalities. If there are, then stage two will examine the nature, causes andextent of the inequalities.All companies have to completestage one, unless they can show they have completed a full pay system review inline with the EOC Code of Practice.Stage one includes a pay systemequality check, to enable employers to assess whether they have a gender paygap. Employers have to answer a number of questions on their equal pay policies.The complexity of a full stage twoequal pay review depends on the organisation’s pay systems and availability ofdata on men and women’s pay. Determining where men and women perform equally atwork will be crucial to this stage. The diversity of approaches to paydetermination among employers makes one simple approach to the more detailedstage two review impossible.The Equal Pay Task Force hasproduced broad guidelines on the key features of this stage.Once stage two has been completedemployers should know the nature and extent of pay gaps within theirorganisations. An action plan is required to eliminate instances of paydiscrimination and provide equal pay within a reasonable timescale.The task force recommends that anaction plan should provide equal pay within a maximum of three years. Keyfigures of the action plan are that it:– Is agreed with recognised tradeunions– Introduces an equal pay policy,if none exists– Changes the processes, rules orpractices of unequal pay– Gives equal pay to current and futureemployees. If a transitional period is required this should be less than threeyears in all but the most complex situations – Sets up a system of regularmonitoring and clear managerial accountability to ensure the pay system is freefrom sex biasFeedback from the professionA recent CIPD survey suggested thatthere is a 17 per cent pay gap between male and female HR directors. PersonnelToday asked six female HR professionals whyFrancesca Okosi,director of human resources, London Borough of Brent “Women HR directors areunderpaid. It is wrong and needs to be changed but it will be difficult due tothe social conditions affecting this. I believe women’s salaries are lessbecause they may take career breaks because of pregnancy. So when they come backthey almost have to start again and their experience is undervalued.”Beverley Shears, HR director,SouthWest Trains“Men may well get paidmore because they have career plans. Unfortunately, I do not think women havethe confidence in themselves to handle high-profile jobs, which needs to beaddressed if the pay gap is to be reduced. The proportion of women in HR andwomen in high-level positions within HR is disproportionate. If we are able tochange this it could help to redress the balance.” Elly Waldron, HRmanager, eDirectory.co.uk“I find it hard tobelieve that companies are able to get away with a gender pay gap at the top inHR. A female director is going to be intelligent, and a female HRdirector is going to know her employment rights, so I am surprised by thefindings. I assume women HR directors do not want to rock the boat”Fiona Colquhoun, HRdirector, ICL“I’m not sure I agreethat women HR directors are paid less than their male counterparts. The issueof gender pay is hard to judge. Companies base pay on ability and what theybelieve the individual is worth. It is often the case that a new person takinga job will get paid more than the previous person, that is the way of theworld.”Carmen Burton, HR executive managerof accountants, Norton practice“The results donot surprise me, as there seems to be two different directions to reach the topin HR. Women traditionally start off at the bottom and work their way up, whilesenior HR men tend to have no or little HR background and often come from otherbusiness areas. This is one of the reasons for the gap in salaries.”Hilary Campbell, HRdirector of call centre outsourcing, Vertex “I do not believe there is pay gap atdirector level in HR between the genders. We (women) are too ready to shout“foul”. Until the number of women at senior level in HR increases it isimpossible to compare salaries – it’s like comparing apples with pears.”Case study: BT shows how it shouldbe doneBT introduced changes in 1998 toits pay review processes of management grades after a number of pay auditsrevealed a gender pay gap in the company.The changes to its pay reviewsystem included an equal pay statement and a specific budget for equal payissues.Bob Mason, senior vice-president ofHR at BT, said pay reviews are conducted after the pay rounds. During the pay rounds the HRdepartment issues guidance to managers reminding them of equal pay policies.Each business then undertakes a pay review to see if there are anydiscrepancies in pay. Where differences are identified,each business unit has a specific budget to assist in redressing the balance.  Mason explained that BT has setaside money specifically to address any equal pay anomalies. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Companies look overseas to help fill skills shortages

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. More than half of companies based in Europe look abroad for job candidates,according to research by Job Partners. The Emergence of e-Recruitment as a Strategic Asset shows that 56 per centof the companies interviewed recruit from overseas. Julian Kulkarni, co-founder and director of the software provider, said,”Companies are looking abroad to try to fill skill gaps they cannot fillin their own country and to help them develop new European markets.” Personnel and recruitment managers are using multiple recruitment methods,with 82 per cent using five or more channels and 58 per cent using over seven,including newspapers, agencies, job fairs and web portals. The research also shows that half of HR directors give detailed reports tothe board. Of those who do, 42 per cent report on tactics used to findcandidates, 41 per cent on their effectiveness and 39 per cent on cost. Eighty-nine per cent of HR managers send e-mails to candidates, but manystill choose the telephone, fax and letters. Kulkarni said, “Many managers are missing a trick. They are not usingsoftware and other applications in a way that could help them worksmarter.” Only 30 per cent use software to support three or more parts of therecruitment process, less than 50 per cent use software to attract jobapplicants and 25 per cent use software to report to management. Personnel directors and recruitment managers from 76 financial services andhigh-tech companies in the UK, France, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlandswere interviewed for the research. www.jobpartners.comBy Katie Hawkins Companies look overseas to help fill skills shortagesOn 12 Jun 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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training

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Arriva online learningTransport services firm Arriva has launched an online learning and development system to provide a programme of e-learning for its 33,000 staff. The company has set-up a dedicated e-learning website called the Gateway, which will bring training directly to staff. The site draws together existing training and external resources into one point of access.weblink www.arriva.co.ukRisk managementAir traffic controllers around Europe are to get new training in risk management via an interactive online course. Eurocontrol, responsible for air navigation safety, is rolling out the course to staff from 30 countries. London-based XOR has created the software, which draws on the lessons learned from high-profile disasters like the King’s Cross fire. It will be followed-up by a two-day classroom course.weblink www.ecacnav.comManagement schoolManagers working at Caledonian Life have the chance to gain internationally-recognised qualifications after the group launched its school of manage-ment. The courses, approved by NEBS, include a team leader award and diploma in management. Based at Mont Clare Hotel in Dublin, the centre will enable staff to help develop business solutions.weblink www.caledonianlife.ieTraining for bankersBanking staff in the Middle East are getting British training on project management, teamwork and communication skills. The tailor-made development programme was introduced following a series of trade missions. The Right Track Consultancy will deliver the training to the Institute of Banking Studies in Kuwait City.weblink www.rtconsult.co.uk trainingOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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E-learning news in brief

first_imgThis month’s e-learning news in brief – Sherpa Integrated Learning has announced four new courses that can be runpurely online, in a traditional classroom or integrated with a classroomsession. All in Good Time (time management), Win, Win, Win (negotiation) andCreative Problem Solving for Teams and Dealing with Difficult People, have beendesigned and written by professional trainers who have graduated from Sherpa’sDesigning and Writing E-learning Content course. The author typically acts asthe e-tutor, providing support for the learner. As an introductory offer,courses are currently half price.  www.sherpa.org.uk– World Wide Learn, provider of the world’s largest directory of onlinecourses, is partnering 13 new training and education providers, offeringtechnical and business training, continuing education and under-graduate andgraduate degree programmes. These include Allied Business Schools, FloridaAtlantic University, Golden Gate University and New York University School ofContinuing Education and Professional Studies.  www.WorldWideLearn.com– Vega Group is playing a key role in the Mars Express mission that liftedoff in June. It designed and built a simulator that was used to train flightoperations engineers and ‘fly’ Mars Express. Vega is also providing flightoperations engineers for the duration of the mission. The mission is due toreach Mars on Christmas Day.  www.vega.co.uk Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. E-learning news in briefOn 1 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Bad vibrations

first_img Comments are closed. A look at the needs of workers who operate handheld vibration tools that mayincrease the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), by JennyMason Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a chronic disorder recognised as anoccupational disease, which occurs following sustained exposure to vibratorypower tools. It is often described as resembling Raynauds disease; however, only thevascular component of the condition can be confused in the two conditions. Vibration white finger (VWF) has been prescribed under the IndustrialDiseases (Prescribed Diseases) Regulations since 1985, as reported by the RoyalCollege of Physicians in 1993.1 In 1997, the British High Courts confirmed that vibrating handheld powertools can cause VWF. The success of this test case, initiated by a group of coal miners, led theGovernment to formally recognise liability in January 2000 and confirm that VWFwas an industrial disease. An agreement to pay compensation to more than 30,000former miners suffering from the disease resulted in payouts of approximately£500m.2 The precise number of construction workers exposed to hazardous levels ofvibration in their work remains unclear. However, based on the success of theminers test case, construction industry employers must be aware of thepotentially high litigation costs that could be imposed if attempts are notmade to reduce these risk factors for their employees. Ramazzini stated as far back as 1713 that: “Certain violent andirregular motions and unnatural postures of the body, by reason of which thenatural structure of the vital machine is so impaired that serious diseasesgradually develop there from”.3 While handheld power tools could hardly have been considered a threat in1713, Ramazzini certainly recognised that repeated physical activities could beresponsible for causing ill health among workers of the day. The adverseeffects of exposure to hand-arm vibration have been recognised since 1911 whenLoriga reported “dead fingers” among Italian miners who usedpneumatic drills.4 HAVS is still prevalent today, and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) hasrecommended health surveillance for all workers in jobs identified as givingrise to significant risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome.5 At present, there is no legislation limiting vibration exposure, but the HSEhas issued guidance to employers in the form of HS(G)88 ‘Vibration’.6 As an occupational disease, it is vitally important that occupational healthadvisers (OHA) are able to recognise the signs and symptoms of the condition.HAVS is a complex condition that can affect the vascular, nervous andmuscular-skeletal systems of the upper limbs – the hands in particular. Vascular damage to one or more of the fingers is characterised by theepisodic blanching of the fingers. The tips are usually the first to demonstrate signs of damage, although thethumbs are not usually affected. Neurological symptoms may include tingling inthe fingers, loss of dexterity and reduced sensitivity to touch andtemperature, and these symptoms occur as a result of damage to the small nerveendings in the skin. Musculoskeletal symptoms can include muscle fatigue and a reduction instrength, although the exact mechanism in the development of these conditionsis still not fully understood.7 Workers employed in cold working areas may experience blanching of thefingers if affected by vibration. As vaso-dilation occurs and the circulationto the fingers is restored, the area flushes dark red, accompanied by pain. In advanced cases, the peripheral circulation becomes sluggish, giving abluish-purple tinge to the skin of the digits, and in very rare, severe cases,trophic skin changes (gangrene) occur in the finger tips.4 The diagnosis and assessment of HAVS requires a detailed medical andoccupational history, including vibration exposure, physical examination andspecial tests to assess the damage to the vascular and sensorineural systems.8 The use of the Stockholm classification in the UK has been recommended bythe HSE and by the Working Party of the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (seebox, right).9 An examination, detailed employment history and assessment of recreationalvibration exposure, will enable the OHA to provide advice and recommendationsto both the employee and employer. To precisely identify those at risk of developing HAVS, the OHA needs tofacilitate a full and detailed risk assessment of employees. A risk assessment of the workplace and of the tools to be used, plus athorough health assessment is necessary. This will allow suitable controlmeasures to be implemented within the organisation. The occupational historyshould serve two functions – to enable the doctor to detect adverse influencesof the patient’s work on their health, and to allow sensible advice to be givenon the effects of the patient’s health on future working ability.10 Staff can be educated at pre-employment induction programmes and/or healthassessments, and the information can be reinforced at regular ‘toolbox talks’given by the OHA or the health and safety officer. These talks enable staff to become fully aware of the need to comply withthe recommendations set, ensuring that the recommended exposure limits tovibration are not exceeded, and that the correct and appropriate personalprotective equipment (PPE) is provided and worn. Because HAVS is a relatively recently recognised occupational disease, manyworkers may have been developing the condition undetected. By inviting employees to undertake health surveillance programmes, the OHAmay recognise the early development of the disease, or those that already havean established condition, and can refer them to an occupational healthphysician. Pre-employment health assessments are an ideal opportunity to assessemployees for potential HAVS. Historically, the construction industry has been reluctant to provide timeor facilities for staff to attend health surveillance programmes. In 1998, theHSE published its Good Health is Good Sense document in an attempt to encourageemployers to view health in the workplace in a more positive light. Injuries and work-related ill health costs the construction industry morethan £3bn a year, equating to £1,500 per employee every year.11 The HSE hopes that management will be encouraged to maintain a healthyworkforce, proving that good health makes good commercial sense. Although no specific legal duties or measures must currently be taken toreduce the risk of HAVS (HSE 1994), there is a need for employers to considerwhat action is required to reduce the potential risk to staff. Derived from the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, the Management andHealth and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (Regulation 3, 1, 1a), clearly statethat every employer should make a suitable and sufficient assessment of therisks to the health and safety of its staff to which they are exposed while atwork. VWF is reportable under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and DangerousOccurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995. The primary cause of HAVS is work that involves holding vibrating tools orwork pieces. Vibration with a frequency range from 2-1500Hertz (cycles persecond or Hz) is potentially damaging , and is most hazardous in the rangebetween 5-20Hz (HSE 1990). Several factors that will affect the severity of the risk need to be takeninto account. The magnitude and the length of time exposed to vibration must becalculated to recommend a safe exposure limit. Considerations need to be maderegarding the grip of the tools and the force required to operate them. Howmuch of the hand is exposed to the tool will determine how much vibration isabsorbed. Climatic factors are also important; HAVS is generally exacerbated in coldweather and conditions. Certain lifestyle factors, such as smoking, can beaddressed at health assessments, as this can also affect the individual’scirculatory system. Although this article has been focused on HAVS among construction workers,the OHA must be aware that other industries may also be exposing staff todeveloping the condition. These would include staff in agriculture andforestry, and often those in engineering or heavy industry. It is highly possible that the construction industry could find itselfdealing with thousands of claims for hand arm vibration syndrome. Evenconsidering the current climate of knowledge, the benefits of healthsurveillance and changes in working practice, the industry could find that thisproblem may continue for many years to come. HAVS could develop into a ‘legal minefield’ for employers, therefore it isvitally important that those providing occupational health become vigilant onhealth surveillance techniques, provide accurate records and ensure that anyrecommendations made are understood and ideally, implemented. Information relating to HAVS is constantly being published in journals –both medical/occupational health and industry. The OHA needs to be constantlyaware of any research-based evidence on the subject, changing practices andrecent legal cases. For example, the European Council has now adopted adirective on physical agents that cause vibration, (2002/44/EC, see Resources,page 31). The days when the only medical care provided on construction sites wassomeone in a first aid hut putting plasters on cuts, are long gone. Certainly, some of the larger construction companies have been leading theway for some time in promoting an effective, pro-active service that will helpimprove the health of staff while at work, but there is still a long way to go.Jenny Mason RGN, BSc (Hons), Dip (OH) References 1. Royal College of Physicians, Hand Transmitted Vibration: Clinical Effectsand Pathophysiology, Part 1: Report of a working Party, The Royal College of Physiciansof London, 1993 2. Law S, Managing Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome, Health and Safety Briefing,No 188, pages 4&5, 2000 3. Ramazzini, Bernardino, Diseases of workers, 1713, The classics ofmedicine library, University of Chicago press, Illinois, published 1940,Special edition 1983 4. Pelmear P, The HAVS, Management OHS & E, July 1999, pages 27-30 5. Lawson I, Nevell D, Review of objective tests for the hand-arm vibrationsyndrome, Occupational Medicine, vol 47, No 1, pages 15-20, 1997 6. Health and Safety Executive, Hand-Arm Vibration HS(G) 88, HSE Books HMSO,1994 7. Shelmerdine L, Managing Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome – A Guide for Nurses,Nursing Standard, Vol 13, 22, pages 45-47, 1999 8. McGeogh K, Welsh C, Results of independent medical interview andexamination in the diagnosis and assessment of hand-arm vibration syndrome,Centre European Journal Public Health Supplement, pages 107&108, 1995 9. Health & Safety Executive, A brief history of Hand-arm vibration,Stockholm scale revised the Taylor-Pelmear scale for assessing both vascularand sensorineural components of VWF, 1987 10. Seaton A, Aguis R, McCloy E and D’Auria D, Practical OccupationalMedicine, 3rd Edition, Arnold, London, 1994 11. Green B, Nursing a Healthy Concern (1995), Contract Journal, 2002, pages18&19 www.hse.gov.uk Bad vibrationsOn 1 Jul 2003 in Musculoskeletal disorders, Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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UK takes risk with disaster policies

first_imgUK takes risk with disaster policiesOn 23 Mar 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Most UK companies could not cope with a disaster, with policies to deal withthe loss of people and skills low on the list of corporate considerations. Research by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) shows that complacencyremains a major issue despite wake-up calls from incidents such as terrorismand internet viruses. The Business Continuity Management report shows that three-quarters ofcompanies have no plans to cover loss of skills and two-thirds are not preparedfor the loss of people. The research found that only four kinds of disruption – loss of IT,telecommunications or site, and fire – are generally covered by the majority ofplans. Christine Hayhurst, director of professional affairs at the CMI, said manyorganisations were taking a big risk with their staff and their reputations. “At best, failure to provide contingency plans for loss of people orindividuals with specific skills can lead to unnecessary pressures in theworkplace,” she said. “At worst, it could close businesses and ruinreputations.” Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Recruitment: The Candidate Opt-out

first_img Comments are closed. Recruitment: The Candidate Opt-outShared from missc on 14 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.center_img Read full article Anyone who has spent a reasonable amount of time in the HR/recruiting industry invariably will have been on the wrong end of candidate opting out of an application process. There are of course a multitude of reasons why this might happen, a lot of which are outside of our control, but sadly in a large amount of cases, accountability rests on the shoulders of the agent/HR pro and in a lot of cases this can have significant ramifications. For example, in agency-land the client can quickly lose faith in an agent’s ability to close the recruitment loop. In internal talent acquisition you will be held accountable for the cost associated with the time spent resulting in a no-hire etc. Not to mention the pounding your reputation could take from the candidate or client perspective if it a regular occurrence. Sadly in HR and recruitment the candidate opt-out is an evil that will always play a part in our role but if we ensure adequate focus on the quality of our communication and efficiency of our processes, the risk will be largely minimized. It’s not rocket science by any means, but it’s good to not lose sight of the basics as our experience grows.Clarity is King: Grey areas are the mortal enemy of any recruiter. When talking to a candidate, the more details that go undiscussed or the more inaccurate the information you give the applicant, the higher the no-hire’o’meter will rise. When talking to a candidate, if you get the impression that any details you’ve divulged about the remit, remuneration package, location or pertinent skills managed to raise the candidate’s eyebrows and perhaps caused un-easiness, DRILL DOWN!. Don’t be happy with getting a half-hearted approval to flick a CV to a client/hiring manager. Ultimately all you will be doing is facilitating the beginning of a fact finding mission for the candidate (which they will opt out of as soon as any facts they don’t like arise) as opposed to offering up all the facts and ascertaining that they are your/clients next superstar. Yes, your CV submittal rate will be higher but your conversion rate will stink.Recruit in a timely manner, without lacking substance. Anyone who has read my previous blog post (Why the long……process) will know my thoughts on drawn out, lengthy recruitment processes. IMO, if a recruiter or HR pro must ask a candidate to go through a 6 stage process in order for them to ascertain suitability, or if they lack the ability to consult properly with their clients/hiring managers around why this is not needed, then there is some serious training required. Personally, I’m a fan of a robust phone screening process followed by a panel interview or a well put together 2 stage interview process. Keeping in mind the candidate experience, neither option would be arduous but will give more than adequate time to ensure a full screening process.As I said, by no means rocket science but I’d suggest just keeping these two things in mind will largely contribute to overall recruitment success rate and conversion ratios.last_img read more

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The Rise of the #T-MOOC (Twitter MOOC) – India HR Chat | India HR Chat

first_img “Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have gained tremendous popularity over the last couple of years. The New York Times dubbed 2012 -‘The Year of the MOOC,’ and it has since become one of the hottest topics in education. “Read full article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The Rise of the #T-MOOC (Twitter MOOC) – India HR Chat | India HR ChatShared from missc on 16 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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SoftBank buys $72M of Compass stock

first_img Tags Masa Son’s firm wrote its first check for nearly $450 million in 2017. In 2018, it invested $160 million and made an $80 million tender offer. And it invested $250 million during Compass’ Series G round in 2019, filings show.After that round, Compass was valued at $6.4 billion. It was the last private funding round before the company went public last week.Compass raised $450 million in its IPO on April 1, although it initially sought to raise twice that amount. Still, the company’s executives and investors now have stock holdings worth millions — and in SoftBank’s case, billions — of dollars on paper.Co-founder and CEO Robert Reffkin owned 8.6 million shares prior to ringing Nasdaq’s opening bell on April 1. Those are now worth $148.9 million. Reffkin will receive more than 25.8 million shares in the coming years, filings show.Prior to the IPO, Compass said the Reffkin family expressed interest in purchasing $18.5 million worth of shares in conjunction with the public offering. On April 6, Reffkin upped his stake by 411,111 shares, which he bought at $18 per share, or $7.4 million.SoftBank and Discovery Capital — Compass’ second-biggest shareholder — also expressed interest in purchasing another $140 million in shares. It doesn’t appear Discovery has done so yet. The hedge fund, led by Robert Citrone, holds 33.5 million shares that are worth $579.8 million.In general, it’s been a good week for the stock market. Both the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average had record closings this week. Nasdaq climbed one percent on Thursday thanks to strong performances from Apple, Netflix, Microsoft and other tech stocks.Earlier this week, SoftBank invested $500 million in digital mortgage lender Better.com. The tech giant purchased shares from existing investors at a $6 billion valuation.Contact E.B. Solomont compassIPORobert Reffkinsoftbank Message* Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son and Compass CEO Robert Reffkin (Getty, Compass)SoftBank has upped its stake in Compass, shelling out $72 million to buy stock in the newly public company.The tech giant, already Compass’ largest shareholder, purchased 4 million shares on April 6 at $18 per share, bringing its total investment to 132.4 million shares, according to filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Sources said the transaction was made as part of Compass’ IPO.On Friday, following a lackluster week of trading in which Compass’ stock dropped 15 percent, shares closed at $17.31. That values SoftBank’s stake around $2.3 billion, slightly lower than the $2.55 billion it was worth at the end of Compass’ first day of trading.ADVERTISEMENTCompass declined to comment.SoftBank holds a roughly 35 percent stake in Compass, after investing nearly $1 billion in the New York brokerage between 2017 and 2019, regulatory filings show.Read moreSoftBank invests $500M in Better.com Who made bank in Compass’ IPO? For agents, Compass IPO is watershed moment Email Address* Full Name*last_img read more