Gayle credits Benn for inspiration in World T20 victory over England

first_imgMUMBAI, India (CMC): Chris Gayle says it was a remark from close teammate, Sulieman Benn, before the start of the West Indies innings, that inspired his scintillating hundred against England on Wednesday. “I was focused and I was a little bit pumped as well. Just before I went out to bat, Sulieman Benn said to me ‘Chris you’ve got to entertain me’,” Gayle said. “Sometimes when someone says such things like that, it kind of actually gives you a bit of buzz as well so Sulieman gave me that spark. I said ‘I’m going to entertain my teammate’. He’s my drinking partner as well so we’re going to have few beers … it’s good to get off on a winning note.” The left-handed Gayle was superb, smashing five fours and 11 massive sixes as he stormed to exactly 100 not out, in the Windies opening game of the Twenty20 World Cup. He needed just 47 balls to reach his landmark, to record the third fastest hundred in T20 Internationals. He put on 55 for the second wicket with Marlon Samuels, who hit a cameo 37, added a further 46 for the third wicket with Denesh Ramdin (12), before combining in a match-winning unbroken fifth wicket stand of 70 off 35 balls with Andre Russell, who finished with a run-a-ball 16 not out. “The preparation has been really, really good. There (were) a lot of throw downs with (coach) Stuart Williams and it has helped a lot,” the 36-year-old said. “It’s all about practicing your skills and then you can exploit them out there in the middle. It worked for me today, it’s a good wicket to bat on and we were chasing a decent total on that sort of wicket, but the dew played a part as well so it was good to get set and take it from there.” On 15 from 12 balls when Samuels fell, Gayle then opened up, racing to his half-century off another 15 balls and then using another 20 deliveries to get to three figures. Gayle said Samuels’s cameo had paved the way for him to play freely. “After facing (my first) over, it actually took a while to get back on strike, but I didn’t lose my composure,” Gayle recalled. “He (Samuels) was getting the boundaries as well so that was actually pretty good because then that kind of eased the pressure a bit and actually gave me a chance to pace my innings and then work out which bowler I was going to take down … and keep ahead of the run rate or keep within the run rate. “It was a fantastic innings and I am really happy to finish the game and not leave it for anyone.” Preparationlast_img read more

Continue Reading →

Kruger Park marks 110 years

first_imgAnimals have right of way on the roads ofthe Kruger Park. (Image: Mary Alexander,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morephotos, visit the image library.) A lilac-breasted roller in the Kruger Park.The Kruger is known for its spectacularbirding as well as game viewing.(Image: Mary Alexander,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morephotos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusThe flagship of the South African National Parks organisation celebrated 110 years of conservation over three weeks in June 2008. The world-renowned Kruger National Park, established in 1898, is the largest game reserve in South Africa and is now a part of the 35 000km² Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, a peace park with no internal borders that joins the Kruger to Zimbabwe’s Gonarezhou National Park and the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique.The three-week-long celebration period, held in various places throughout the region, was planned to give as many people as possible the chance to join in the festivities.At the final ceremony in Skukuza, the Kruger’s main rest camp and administrative headquarters, Environmental Affairs and Tourism Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk and other dignitaries paid tribute to the park and to the people who have helped make it one of the country’s most valuable tourism assets as well as a respected contributor to conservation efforts over the years.“There is no doubt in my mind that the park holds a special place in everyone’s hearts,” said Van Schalkwyk, “and over the last 110 years it has become an icon for the country on many levels, including conservation, tourism and national pride”.The minister added that the park received over 1.3-million visitors during the last financial year. In 2003 the number of tourists to the park exceeded a million for the first time, a feat that has been achieved every year since then.Tackling the issue of global warming and how it affects the park, Van Schalkwyk explained that plans are in place to “assess how the planning, management and expansion of our national parks can build resilience to climate change. Increasingly, we are integrating a greater variety of habitats and altitudes that reduce the risks to endemic species into our protected areas design.”Celebrating natural and cultural diversityOther items at the Skukuza event included a drill demonstration by the Kruger Park ranger corps, performances by dancers of various cultures from around the park, a performance of the special Kruger Park song by the park’s own choir and the cutting of the birthday cake.The Kruger Park song, titled “Great Wilderness Great”, was commissioned especially for the event and was composed by songwriter Shalati Joseph Khosa of Ba-Phalaborwa. “The Kruger Park is a huge inspiration to me and I feel that it is one of our nation’s most valuable heritage assets, so it was a natural step for me to write this song,” said Khosa.During the course of the celebrations the South African Mint introduced the 2008 gold Krugerrand. The Krugerrand is a 22-carat gold coin weighing one troy ounce, with smaller denominations also available. The first coin was struck at the Mint in 1967.The 2008 coin was manufactured with an antique hand-press, used by former South African president Paul Kruger’s government-in-exile to create money during its hostilities with the British forces around the time of the South African War (1899 – 1902). The current edition features a “110 Years KNP” logo, and 110 of these coins have been allocated to Kruger Park visitors, who will obtain them on a first-come-first-serve basis by filling out an order form available at all entrance gates.As big as a countryCovering almost 19 000km², the Kruger National Park is comparable in size to the whole of Wales or Israel. It came into being in 1898 but was then known as the Sabie Game Reserve. Development came a standstill during the South African War, but afterwards the victorious British took up the reins again, tasking Major James Stevenson-Hamilton in 1902 with the responsibility of looking after the area.Stevenson-Hamilton, the first warden of the park, retired in 1946 after holding the post for 44 years. He is commemorated in the name of the park’s main rest camp Skukuza, which is a Xitsonga word meaning “he who sweeps clean” and refers to his tireless efforts to control poaching.The warden worked hard to gain official status for the park and in 1926 his efforts were rewarded when the government passed the National Parks Act and proclaimed the Kruger National Park, naming it after the president at the time, Paul Kruger.Stevenson-Hamilton was joined in 1902 by new assistant warden Harry Wolhuter, who famously survived an attack from two lions in 1904, armed with nothing more than a pocketknife. He killed the first lion with the weapon and his dog kept the second lion at bay until help arrived. The knife and the lion skin can be seen in the Stevenson-Hamilton Memorial Museum at Skukuza.Biodiversity hotspotAs well as now forming part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, the Kruger is also part of the Kruger to Canyons biosphere, an area designated as such by the United Nations Education and Scientific Organisation under its Man and Biosphere programme. Biosphere reserves are recognised internationally as important areas for conserving biological diversity and developing the necessary scientific and technical knowledge, as well as human values, for successful conservation efforts.The Kruger to Canyons biosphere, encompassing a remarkable 55% of South Africa’s total terrestrial biodiversity, is located in eastern South Africa and bridges the Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces. It contains a diversity of landscapes, ranging in altitude from more than 2km above sea level along the Drakensberg escarpment to 300m above sea level nearer the coast.The reserve is home to more than 1.5-million people, and in addition to accommodating a variety of animals including rare antelope such as Tsessebe, Sable and Roan, it is one of the few remaining viable habitats for the African wild dog, the continent’s most endangered predator.The Big Five and Little FiveKnown for spectacular sightings of the famous Big Five (African elephant, lion, Cape buffalo, leopard and black or white rhino), the Kruger Park offers incomparable game viewing, with about 145 animal species, 110 reptile species, and more than 500 bird species occurring in the area. In addition to the Big Five, all major African big game species are found here, including hippopotamus, giraffe, zebra, warthog, many antelope species, and large carnivores including cheetah, wild dog and spotted hyena.For those who enjoy a challenge, the area is also home to the Little Five (buffalo weaver, elephant shrew, leopard tortoise, ant lion and rhino beetle) and the birding Big Six (ground hornbill, kori bustard, lappet-faced vulture, martial eagle, Pel’s fishing owl and saddle-bill stork).The park is divided into six ecosystems: baobab sandveld, mopane scrub, lebombo knobthorn-marula bushveld, mixed acacia thicket, combretum-silver clusterleaf woodland on granite and riverine forest. Altogether it has 1 982 species of plants, some of which are the baobab, kiaat tree, fever tree, knobthorn, marula and mopane trees.The Kruger Park offers accommodation to suit the needs and preferences of just about anyone, ranging from five-star luxury to self-catering bungalows, tented camps, and caravans.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Useful linksThe Kruger National ParkSouth African National ParksKruger to Canyons biosphereGreat Limpopo Transfrontier ParkSouth African National ParksPeace Parks FoundationDepartment of Environmental Affairs and TourismSouth African MintRand Refinery (Krugerrand producer)last_img read more

Continue Reading →

Apple Farm Service now offering Arrowquip cattle handling equipment

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Arrowquip is pleased to introduce the newest member of the Arrowquip Family: Apple Farm Service Inc. of Covington. Apple Farm Service has earned their reputation within the agricultural and construction industries as a provider of top-quality equipment and customer service. They are now expanding their service into a new avenue by providing ranchers with innovative cattle handling solutions designed to benefit the rancher and the ranch.“Their knowledge of high-quality agricultural and construction equipment is extensive, and we are confident that our cattle equipment is an excellent fit Apple Farm Service’s manufacturer lineup,” said Andrew Firth, Arrowquip president. “We are thrilled to have Apple Farm Service join our valued Dealer Network.”Apple Farm Service Inc. was founded by Henry Apple in 1956, originally under the name of “Apple Chopper Service.” From humble beginnings as a small shop on Henry’s farm in Ohio, the business has grown to include locations in Covington, Botkins, Mechanicsburg, and West College Corner, Ind. They are experts in farm and agricultural equipment, and carry equipment and parts from over 100 top quality manufacturers. Apple Farm Service remains a family owned company, with Henry’s son Bill and family expanding upon his vision to provide quality and innovation to the farm community in Ohio and beyond.Arrowquip was founded in 1988 by the Firth family in Australia. In the last 30 years, Arrowquip has become a world-renowned manufacturer of cattle handling solutions known for their innovative designs, technological advancements, investment in animal science, and forward-thinking equipment. They have become the most sought-after cattle equipment manufacturer in the market today.Arrowquip’s New 600 Series Equipment, the Q-Catch 86 Series, Q-Power 106 Series, and Portable Q-Catch 86 Series have redefined the cattle handling industry with never before seen advancements in cattle handling. Arrowquip’s R&D Team looked at every contact point of the chute that might make enough noise to spook the animal and spent over 2,000 hours engineering a solution for each one. The result is a lineup of chutes like no other that are quick, quiet, and built with the quality that only Arrowquip can provide. By adhering to animal science standards and refusing to settle for “good enough” with their equipment, Arrowquip has designed a lineup of chutes that offer unparalleled access and absolute silence to the rancher operation. The 600 Series is the most innovative line of cattle chutes ever produced, and ranchers around the world are seeking out their safe, easy to use, efficient cattle handling solutions.last_img read more

Continue Reading →

Wanting Your Yes More Than They Want Their No

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now Your mindset matters a great deal, especially as it pertains to prospecting. Even though people bandy about all kinds of statistics about how poorly this method or that method may work, the truth of the matter is that your mindset is largely responsible for your results.Let’s boil it down to a statement: You must want a yes more than your prospective client wants their no.Here, we need a disclaimer. Wanting your yes doesn’t mean that you get to act selfishly and self-oriented, using the tools of a two-year-old or a full-grown bully. Nor does it allow for any action that would subtract from trust and lessen your dream client’s desire to work with you. It does, however, include an impatiently impatient, professional persistence.If you want a yes and receive a no, wanting that yes means you ask for the meeting you want a second time, modifying your approach to trade more value for the time you are asking for and increasing the odds of reversing the no.The yes you are after may require that pause in your pursuit, waiting a short period of time, and trying again. The short pause is intentional and no indication that you are giving up. Knowing that timing can help or hurt you, you try again later, but not too much later. Your dream client gets to keep their no for now, because you value the relationship more than the transaction, and because you are not desperate.Your dream client’s no was in response to a single ask. Varying your approach in what you ask for and how you ask, you change your approach to one that may increase the chances of a yes. The next ask you make can be different than the earlier ask. It can be funnier, more engaging, and show a side of your personality that gives them the idea that you are the kind of person that they would like to work with instead of the same boring, tired trope they hear from others.The recipe for struggling to produce results in prospecting is to continue to do the same thing over and over again, without creating greater value, without a professional approach, and without varying how you ask and engage your dream client.If you want your yes more than your dream client wants their no, you will persist until you find a way to get a yes.last_img read more

Continue Reading →